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in the current state of the economy. this is from fall of 2012. we will see if that changes post-boston and if those numbers go up. this goes to the earlier segment that you aired, this idea that the united states is compcent with respect to terrorism. i think the survey demonstrates it is among the things that people think about your it i also think that the law enforcement community is certainly not complacent when it comes to terrorism. the boston event was a security event. there's a lot of individuals covering that event, from federal, state and local. i don't think that boston happened due to complacency. i don't think we necessarily are complacent. m asink we have accepted ew facet of our reality, albeit one that does not happen that frequently. host: if you want to look at the numbers, you can go to start.umd.edu to get more information. bill braniff, from the national consortium for the study of terrorism & responses to terrorism. caller: good morning. i think these two crimes are quite separate. the man in connecticut was angry concerning his disease. he shot his mother
because the economy s been desoying money since the real estate market crashed. it's an offsetting situation and it is reversible. if the private markets were creating welgts and thefederal reserve which is creating money, yeah, you'd probably have inflation. but there's proof in the balance of the cpi has been the flattest it's been -- >> somewhere, that this you're going through is going to meet. and that may spark it. but what you're saying is that gold is still way above an inflation curve? >> yeah, it's not thing -- look, i don't believe there's going to be rampant inflation. but iffyou do there is dozens of strategies that are not gold that will do a better job for an investor. especially a small individual investor who's not an institutionalized, billions of dollars to allocate -- >> like real estate? >> real estate remains the ultimate inflation hedge for the average person. you can buy at depressed prices, boht a $200,000 house with a $150,000 fixed rate loan for 3%, thank you federal government for backing it. if there's hyperinflation wouldn't that home be worth $1 milli
the attack may impact american business, our economy and our nation's capitol and overall national security. steve moore from the "wall street journal" wonderful to have you in studio. the politics dealing with the aftermath of a terrorist attack? how does it improve the tone of partisanship in washington. >> anytime you have a national attack like this people pull together. i was thinking of the two major issues in washington. lori: immigration and gun control. >> those are two we've been hang link over months and months if not years. that is interesting i think it could have negative impact on both issues. lori: how so. , if it turns out it is saudis or foreigners, it will, it will, play into this kind of nativist, keep the foreigners out mentality. that is going to be a negative thing. in fact some of the senators and congressmen already said that maybe we should slow down on immigration reform. lori: wow! all the debate on immigration was held behind closed doors with the "gang of eight". that itself was critical because of the lack of transparency. >> interesting just today the "gang o
by now if we were going to have it. and yet i keep on -- the fed is printing money because the economy has been destroying money since the real estate market crashed. it's an offsetting situation and it is reversible. if the private markets were creating welgts and the federal reserve which is creating money, yeah, you'd probably have inflation. but there's proof in the balance of the cpi has been the flattest it's been -- >> somewhere, that this you're going through is going to meet. and that may spark it. but what you're saying is that gold is still way above an inflation curve? >> yeah, it's not thing -- look, i don't believe there's going to be rampant inflation. but iffyou do there is dozens of strategies that are not gold that will do a better job for an investor. especially a small individual investor who's not an institutionalized, billions of dollars to allocate -- >> like real estate? >> real estate remains the ultimate inflation hedge for the average person. you can buy at depressed prices, bought a $200,000 house with a $150,000 fixed rate loan for 3%, thank you federal gov
the stock averages and they've been told the economy is doing great, so what's changed? you know, what's changed is that we got a little complacent. i think everybody looks at the market and says we weren't really fulling gauging what might happen if the economy slows down or doesn't speed up. i think today was just the wreck reckoning for a lot of those concerns. >> we've been in a period where people are expecting a correction from whatever highs we've been hitting here lately. do you think this is the beginning of that correction right now? >> i think we're certainly seeing a bit of a correction. i don't know how much more it has tooz, however, because fundamentally, we have very low interest rates and u.s. corporations are still posting record high levels of earnings against the backdrop of a weak global economy. if we get a big downdraft from whatever happens out of boston or some other factor, that's a real risk factor, but near term, very strong earnings, hard to argue with stocks with that backdrop. >> you just mexed the boston marathon incident. we doebt have the complete stor
. maybe this shows it is very positive from the standpoint of the economy, if you use dynamic scoring. if you use statics deploring it is not and cannot so well. -- static scoring it is not going to come out so well. i have a question for the other witness. you said this in your statement tionhis is aasnab. the obvious question is whether or not there are sufficient jobs for average americans and illegal immigrants. the answer is no. >> as i indicated to us recently. latere have a participation rate we have a supply of low-skilled labor. it appears that what do is leapfrogging those individuals. we have millions upon millions of americans, not just black americans, but millions upon millions who do not have a job right now. i think it is a good idea to inform -- to reform immigration system but regard must be given to the fact that we have an over abundance of people not working today. we are at rates we have not sn in 80, 75 years. it is astonishing. if we have regularize asian of a greater pool of individuals who can compete on a one by one basis with americans here today those indi
of tumultuous, russia's president is coming under controver controversy. while russia's economy hadn't performed badly last year, falling commodity prices risk pushing the country into recession. these comments come just hours after president putin threatened to fire officials for not following his orders on public spending. geoff cutmore is outside this event. what are you hearing about these concerns and the russian economy overnight? >> reporter: absolutely. fascinating issue. we clearly see some risks emerging in the russian government at this point. and i just want to put that issue to one side for a moment. because i have with me li jiaoung. he is a former chinese minister. i'm fortunate to get the opportunity to talk to him at this event. thanks very much for speaking to me. if i could just start off by asking you, clearly, the world has been focused on the terrorist events in boston and this tragic, very un pleasaplea event. i wonder if you could dwifs a perspective from the chinese point of view here because nobody wants to see terrorism and in particular i think the chinese have an int
. this looks that the impact on jobs and the economy. >> immigration. the average american wants to -- >> grace wiseman second place winners in the student cam, petition. their message look set a legal immigration and the impact on jobs in the u.s. economy. >> immigration, allowing people to enter our borders can be beneficial to immigrants and the rest of the country. >> when it comes to immigration, it is not right versus left, republican vs. democrat issue. it is those who have power to influence policy. and the average american heart regardless of political affiliation does want to see immigration laws enforced. amnesty. chris immigration laws. take up the highest unemployment rate right now is the young people. -- >> the highest and a plummet right now is the young people. the problem is is the way we have done it, they do not pay tax. you have to pay tax. and the employer would pay the tax. a ford are did not pay because it will not be here -- foreigner does not pay because they will not be here long. but we did not have the employer pay either. if the employer hires you, you will have to
or does it matter if an economy will print or grow or whatever? >> the study which said once government debt hits 90% of gdp growth goes off a cliff has been thoroughly discredited and they must kick themselves that they made a mistake on the spreadsheet. people pay attention to the paper which has just come out that shows that this is a pretty sloppy piece of work. the conclusion drawn in terms of the impact of high debt to growth has been basically discredited now. it's fairly clear that governments have a lot more scope to deal with problems. >> was china wrong to pursue this strategy then to help cushion the effect of the global financial crisis and even though people are quite concerned about it including some of the chinese themselves, it sounds like from what you're saying all things considered you don't see a hard landing or crisis as a result. >> as you always say in china, it's too early to tell. i think they have a margin to get things right. if you look at greece, they went into european monetary union and have this lovely window to fix things. a lot of credit with foreign i
agricultural workers to seek nonfarm jobs as economy improved in the 1990s. the special agricultural workers who left farm work were replaced by new arrived unauthorized migrant. by 1997 and 1998 it was estimated that the special agricultural workers were only about 16% of the crop workers. so, mr. connor, aren't we afraid or shouldn't we be afraid giving legal status to people here illegally will repeat the mistakes we made in 1986 putting the ag industry in the same position in the long run. in other words it comes about because of farmers come to us and they need workers. okay. we bring in the workers. then they migrate someplace else and people illegally came in after wards. how do we avoid the mistake we made in 1986? >> senate grassley, your question is a great question. it's -- it goes to the heart of fundamentally of the basis of our negotiation that on o- curing in senator feinstein's office. the blue card program for the current existing trained work force is an important component. equal we don't know with absolute certainty over the next decade or so what is going to be the statu
economy looks like. and as life changes, fidelity can help you readjust your investments along the way. refocus as careers change and kids and head off to college. and rebuild your plan. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help you refine your personal economy. turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business. offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? and now bbc world news america. world newsbbc america. reportingrong am katty kay. they hav endured. residents of boston have been warned not to go outside as police search for the suspect in the boston marathon bombing. the father of the boys defenses son -- his sons. >> only god almighty knows what really happens. >> we still do not know what motivated the attack. did the brothers of the lawn or is it part of a wider terror -- did the brothers act on their own, or is it part of a wider terror plot? we talk to the man in charge of homelan
plans down the road. it's a fox business exclusive and a good read on the economy. that's next. as the an anticipation for apple earnings reports mount, we'll look at the best selling mobile phones, not just now, but of all time. phones that you may be surprised to see that app iphone is not in the top three. stay tuned. ♪ ♪ @ why are 8 million people why are 8 million people sleeping better tonight? they went to a sleep number store. the only place in the world you'll find the sleep number bed. a bed with dual air technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs. each of your bodies. the only place you'll find our bed-clinically proven to help each of you slee more soundly. and the only place you'll find sleep professionals that will help you find a number that will change your life. your sleep number setting. you won't find any of these innovations in an ordinary mattress store. you'll only find sleep number at one of our over 400 stores nationwide. and now you can save $400 on the only memory foam bed with sleep number technology that adjusts to e
to securing our borders, just starting our economy, and ensuring for access to that great american dream. the current status quo on immigration makes no sense. we turn away people from entering the country who could create thousands of jobs and let in people crossing our borders who take away jobs. our approach is balanced. the border security triggers are strong, but achievable. the path to citizenship is tough, but it is accessible. yes, our bill does secure the border first, but it treats the situation of those living in the shadows as an equally urgent priority. this is by design. we believe that americans will support sensible solutions to dealing with the undocumented and future legal immigrants, but only if they are convinced there will not be future waves of illegal immigrants. when the 11 million come out of the shadows and it will not only improve their lives and their families' lives, it will strengthen our country and its economies. in fact, conservative economist douglas holtz eakin has found that immigration reform will save taxpayers $2.7 trillion. we wanted this legislati
they will have going forward on our economy. dagen: peter barnes has much more on this. peter: we looked at research reports on the impact of attacks of 9/11 back in 2001. the current economy has shown some softness recently in job creation and retail sales. any hits to consumer confidence may make things worse. two economists that i have talked to this morning do not think it will get too bad. the 9/11 attacks were targeted for the financial systems. consumer confidence rose sharply after the 9/11 attacks. experiencing the biggest monthly drop in a decade. the attacks caused more than 400 mass layoffs and displaced 130,000 workers. industrial production fell back then. the unemployment rate jumped more than a half a percentage point. we were already in a recession that september. we are not in a recession today. boston is not an economic center. >> maybe a day or two people will be hesitant about going out shopping. assuming nothing else happens, it should last much longer. peter: it could take a short-term hit because of boston. they are more worried about the impact on the economy and
manufacturing sector, creating new jobs and growing the economy for american families. energy is the foundation of our economy. we need to focus on the promise of prosperity. north american energy prosperity and the abundance that it offers to our country. america's greatness is tied to our freedom to produce and build things. republicans have a plan to grow our economy by making america a nation of builders once again. we want to streamline our government, cut red tape, and unleash the power of north american energy. with these things we can revitalize american manufacturing, and foster long-term economic growth and job creation for our citizens. lastly, we're determined to get to the truth regarding the terrorist attack on our nation's in benghazi, libya. in which three americans lost their lives. last year, i directed five committees to look at there is parts of this investigation. the next week, these committees will provide a comprehensive progress report on the investigation up to now. and this progress report will not represent the conclusion of their investigation, but it will be the be
the economy french economy is in. now, the german survey responses say the economies were worried about the impact prices. in france, they're much more domestically focused with some suggestions that things couldn't get any worse. >> well, the domestic situation is already a known negative. just to recap for viewers, as well, the composite, which includes both the services and is manufacturing, pmi came in at 46.5 in april for the eurozone. that was just ever so slightly above the 46.4 estimate and manufacturing came in 46.5. the services figure was 46.6. but, again, it's some of the weakness in the core economy of germany that's catching the market's attention this morning. the euro weaker, the xetra dax off by about 0.2%. we're going to get some uk data out at 9:30. also coming up on the show, the how companies are battling to take a foothold in the alternative energy market in china. then at 11:10, we'll be joined by jim o'neill as he nears the end of his tenure at goldman sachs. we'll get his best and worst investment calls from his time in the city. we'll hear up for earnings from
say that the last ten years has been very bad for the economy. we've lost a lot of valuable resources and a lot of the momentum that we've had on. before, we had open markets and entrepreneurship and that's what helped china succeed. we have to go back to market forces as well as fight construction. >> so juan nubol there talking about the last decade. he was the guy that tried to buy 300 kilometers of ice and is we'll talk about that a little later, as well. clear now there is a hope for reform. i'm pleased to say kung mingh, the founder of lenovo who bought the business from ibm, he explained to eunice what he wanted from private reform to help private business in the country. >> translator: my view is that the chinese government should adopt a more systemic and comprehensive approach, for example, how to escape a better sense of reform in this country so that the public will have more confidence in ensuring the culture of mutual trust can be established. >> what's interesting is that this group, also becoming more influential in political circles. we'll hear a little later from the
and the free enterprise piece of this which gives our economy most vigor and i would advise people that are preparing to take the nationalization test, that's a choice by the educational foundation to understand our history and language, one of the questions that will be there, what is the economic system of the united states? the answer to that is free enterprise capitalism. that's what gives our economy its vigor. and when we move away, when we move towards government management of our economy, government bailouts, government deciding who is too big to allow o fail, so much of our economy loses its vigor and we lose some of the promise of the great american civilization. another piece of this also that i speak to relatively often, mr. speaker, and that is american vigor and last component of the american exceptionalism that i'll list here tonight. american vigor, where does that come from? well, we have natural-born american citizens that are part of the civilization and culture. and they are -- and these natural-born american citizens are the did he sent ants who came here with
francisco, oakland, seattle, and tacoma combined, upon which a bulk of the u.s. economy relies. we must strengthen recovery in the event of a biological attack, which is still the most worrying threat out there. we need to make sure that the public understands the nature of these threats and how it can help identify and respond to them. above all, it needs to understand how not to respond to them. when bad things happen, it's easy to react out of fear, emotion and anger. let's hope that in boston this week we begin to chart a different course. for more on this, you can read my column in a special edition of "time" magazine on the tragedy in boston. let's get started. >>> joining me now the man who runs the biggest police force in america and one of the country's best intelligence divisions, ray kelly, the commissioner of new york. what do you have to tell us in the aftermath of this? is there a heightened sense of danger? are you seeing threats proliferate? >> no, we haven't seen an increase in threats, but our operating assumption is that we're always at risk. we're a city that obvious
're going to talk markets, the economy and much, much more. stay tuned for that and a lot more. >>> welcome back. now to the markets. it's going to be a big weekend ahead. joining us, lou brian. lou, place your betts. more likely up or down for the dow this week? well, you know what? i tend to look technically at the s&p instead of the dow. >> how about the s&p? it's a broader market index, even better. >> all right. i think that the interesting thing is that where the s&p held last week, this 1540 is a mark that held in march and early april and, again, last week, we went just a little below it. also in play around that level is the 50-day moving average which held the market a couple of times. if you're looking to get long on a tray, that's not a bed level because you kind of know where you're wrong when it goes underneath that. i think the interesting thing with the stock market is that it's really the only market right now that's playing along with the fed's qe brochure. don't fight the fed. buy on fed accommodation. the crude oil, the gold, copper, various commodities are lower since t
. part of it is the economy. improving economy in the united states tends to attract people as well. we just haven't seen that, but monitor those flms -- numbers. we have -- the thing that troubles me the most is the smugglers who do this for profit, who are taking creative routes either up through the bahamas, we're seeing haitians being run through puerto rico right now. so it's a constant battle as the smugglers get smarter and daring. they are smaller than the land border. >> the smuggler industry, for lack of a better term, is that on the increase, is that on the decrease? what's the trend? it's an recollection spencive undertaking. my understanding is they charge thousands of dollars per person they bring. is that something we've seen an increase in or decrease and if we've seen a decrease, is it because of economic factors? how do we stop these? it sounds like a fast boat through the middle of the caribbean is not something we would necessarily stop. >> i think flow of migrants, it's similar to the flow of drugs. people are very creative. yes, we've seen an increase in those peop
$100, and in september of 2011, copper price a reflection of the week call for the global economy, china news earlier this week, bearish, copper prices down 6%. if you're looking for gains, the agricultural sector saw some, and, and natural gas of 4 present. and someone you did the action in today's session. and $100 from the close of around $400 a troy ounce. and gold will average 1450 a troy ounce, in 2014. we also see reports of stronger jewelry demand, gold has come down significantly, some buyers stepping in at these levels and copper falling out of favor of this week on weaker reports out of china and also copper is down 6%. lots of volatility, wrapping up the week more muted reaction. melissa: let's check the markets and go to the stock exchange. lauren simonetti is standing by. >> the volatility sandra is talking about is the volatility we are seeing here on wall street. what a week. the dow can't seem to stay or get into the positive at this hour but the nasdaq and the s&p are higher, this has been the worst week of the year for all three major averages, the worst week si
workers is significant in our stagnant economy. the unemployment rate for blacks without a high school diploma was 12 percent, today, it's more than doubled, to 24.6%. now, that clearly shows that we have an oversupply of low skilled labor relative to the -- that is for workers in all such classes, particularly black americans, because research shows that 40 percent of the 18-point percentage decline in the employment rates of black males is attributable to illegal immigration. that's hundreds of thousands of blacks without jobs. it translates to hundreds of thousands who can't pay taxes, who don't support their families on their own dime. the evidence also indicated that in addition to the pressing wage -- sorry, employment levels, illegal immigration drove down wage levels, by the federal reserve bank of atlanta, for example, showed that illegal immigration, and the spike in illegal immigration, was attributable to the nearly $960 per year decrease in wage levels of documented georgians. and the leisure and hospitality industries, it was $1520. for doctors and lawyers, $960 may not b
economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change fidelity can help you jafflet your retirement plan, rethink how you are invested and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today the fidelity i.r.a. has a wagering of choices to fit your personal economy. fidelity investments, turn here. >> bbc world news was captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: the surviving suspect in the boston bombings was charged today with the use of a weapon of mass destruction. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we update the investigation, both in the u.s. and abroad, into the two brothers believed to be behind the blasts, as the youngest remains hospitalized in serious, but stable condition. >> ifill: and we explore the legal questions raised by trying dzhokhar tsarnaev in federal court. >> brown: then, ray suarez gets an update on guantanamo bay, where more than half the prisoners are now on a hunger strike, protesting their indefinite detentions. >> ifill: paul solman ha
: seasonally strong time of year for home sales. overall, the u.s. economy is running below its historical trend. this is a study done by the index. my next guest says the economy sluggish growth may be the most ideal condition for investors. joining us is now jack. welcome to you. >> thank you, lori. lori: you see this as a prime opportunity. some new investment dollars could go into the stock market. >> yes, potentially. fair value in the market is probably about 1520. we are slightly ahead of that. we have a lot of favorable factors. one, keep money. we have stocks that look cheap. if we can get confidence, you know, of investors, but also builds confidence picking up, i think you could see treasurers and armature treasurers start to exploit that difference. as long as the fed keeps the backdrop in place, then the market can go higher. we do not want to fall into a double dip type of scenario. on the other hand, we do not want anything too strong to suggest that perhaps the fed will take its foot off the accelerator. lori: if you have new money to invest, what type of stocks would you p
reporting exceeded estimations. it is an indication of -- of -- of a stronger economy. if somebody told me we would have a 5% correction i would say look at that as an opportunity to get into the market. >> which is basically what you just said, jonathan, right? >> yeah, i do think larry is perhaps a lit totle too optimis. cull pans are beating the quarter and missing revenue estimates. if you take out financials because of special, some things are specific to their sector, you really are seeing negative earnings growth not compared to prior quarter but a year ago. things are weak. domestic companies doing much better than companies with big global footprints. >> what are you expecting from the week ahead? more heavy earnings numbers coming out. brig group of companies. and the gdp end of the week. >> i think actually for the reason. a lot more chop in the market. a lot of two way action. company specific. i think we have to get a little bit of clarity on whether companies feel this is just a little rough patch. we are going to pick up on the back end. there is an interesting wrinkle below
, weekly jobless claims of. the market down. four out of the five past days. the state of the economy next. alec, for this mission i upgraded your smart phone. ♪ right. but the most important feature of all is... the capital one purchase eraser. i can redeem the double miles i earn witmy ventu car sauce to erase recent tvel purchases. d with a few clicks, this mission never happened. uh, what's this button do? [ electricity zaps ] ♪ you requested backup? yes. yes i did. what's in your wallet? could lose tens of thousands of dollars on their 401(k) to hidden fees. thafully e-trade has low cost investments and no hidden fees. but, you know, if you're still bent on blowing this fat stack of cash, there's a couple of ways you could do it. ♪ ♪ or just go to e-trade and save it. boom. ♪ ♪ lou: optimism about economic growth commissioning -- diminishing as markets posted sharp losses for a third day this week. talk about the short-term. joining me now with his outlook for the economy, former bp, the president and ceo of the cake schiller institute. good to have you with us. >> goo
market since the start of this cycle. weakness in oil could portend investors worries that the economies are slowing down not just in china but globally as well. so that will probably put pressure on the market. the other thing too, we're in the earnings season and this might be the quarter that doesn't delight. that is that we do get some dispoints manned -- disappointments and we get stiff reactions to the disappointments. lori: bob, you were cautious yet looking for stocks to show gains for the year. what do you think will get us past these bumps in the road? >> i think the bumps in the road should not be unexpected. the market is up 20% since last june. so it is not unusual to have a five to 7% correction at this stage. following on gene's comments, we are in earnings season. interesting when you look this year, i think that will be stimulus for further correction. expectations are 5% increase over last year for this quarter. 7% for the second quarter. 18% for the third quarter and 28 for the fourth. i think as companies report, analysts will be really focused on what the guidance be
and perhaps boosting our economy if we can't be sure who to let in? with me now are american enterprise scholar maaed din, we also have economist extraordinaire, professor peter morici. thanks for joining us. madeine, let me start with you. as we said, as we look at this immigration bill, you can immediately feel a reaction coming out of what happened with boston. to slow down on anything that we might be doing including student visas, including asylum, including some of the workers that we would need especially in the area of student visas who might graduate and then be productive in their economy. what are your thoughts on this? >> well, melissa, that's a great question, and thanks for having here to talk about this. the immigration bill that's before the senate right now, it's a great piece of legislation. and it would have no bearing whatsoever on the vy tragic events that happened in boston. the reality is that people who are here, unfortunately, be they native or immigrant, sometimes you commit horrific acts. but we don't base immigration policy on that. we should base it on our e
teach japan economy at georgetown. you're making the summit interesting again. the interesting problems that you face, and i d not envy you, is you said the fits call consolidation, the consumption tax will go up next year and the following year, and you're certainly aware that will take a big hit on consumption on income that will have a negative impact on the economy, and i'm wondering how you're balancing these two different issues of fiscal consolidation and demand. [speaking japanese] >> translator: i think you have hit on the most important point, because whenever we may try to increase the taxes, it does not necessarily result in increasing the tax revenue. we have known the actual examples which have happened in the past in many nrsakg ne >> you can watch the rest of this online as we take you live now to the heritage foundation in washington, d.c. for remarks by senator mike lee of utah. he'll be talking about the conservative movement and the future of the republican party. >> in his most recent book, "we still hold these truths: rediscovering our principles, reclaiming our fu
economy still in front of us that we need solutions for. and i think the women can very much be part of that debate in bringing it forward. >> i've always been struck by the fact that even when there weren't 20, that the women senators have always bonded across party lines. and across ideological lines. i know that lisa murkowsky's vote against gun background checks was a big disappointment to many of you and she was supposed to be the host of tonight's get-together until it was moved to the white house. and heidi heitkamp, how difficult might that conversation with with the white house. we told that the white house was very angry with her to have voted against the background checks. >> you know, andrea, both heidi heitkamp and lisa murkowsky voted for the gun trafficking bill. there was a measure that they were willing to support to end gun trafficking, straw purchasing, pro enforcement measures. so i think there's bipartisan support for these bills, i think we can find consensus going forward and we have to work a little harder. i find the women to be very open to these issues and
, but until the economy improves they're the not going to get out of the way and i think because of that, this market will go up and more talk about that this week. >> we're only what, a couple-- we were down on the week about a couple hundred points, that's not a major selloff by any means. larry, thanks indeed. you're saying the market is trying to go up, we shall see. we have a news background, not yet occurred, at ten o'clock, half hour from now we're going to get the existing home sales, a very big pointing that is supposedly improving housing market. you'll get the numbers as we them, too. i want to warn you, coming up on friday, the latest gdp numbers, they're going to be inflated and show a rate of growth maybe 3%, very strong. but, there's a new calculation involved. so watch out there. the dow is now open for business. we're up 5 in the very early going, yeah, the up trend in place, first thing this monday morning. and why are we going to show you the price of a foreign corporation? why are we doing that? i'll tell you because the japanese stocks are going straight up as the ye
worried about china especially about the economy after the lower than expected growth numbers that we saw this week. and he addressed that. he was talking a bit about the concerns about rising debt levels and he played those down. he played down the weaker growth. >> i don't think people should panic about chinese economy will continue to grow at the sustainable level. the government's target could be fulfilled without much difficulty and we aim at the quality of the growth. i don't think achieving 7, 7.5% is a big deal for china. i don't think so. >> the fund invests heavily in resources. i couldn't help myself from asking him specifically about gold. he believes the sudden drop in gold is general instability in the global economy. he hopes it comes back at some point soon. >> thank you very much. we were watching that and that's the perfect segue. we've been watching what's happening and it's important to see what the chinese think about this and no better person than cic chairman. we'll talk about gold and what's been happening not only with gold but also oil prices after yesterday slu
. it is the perfect example of the program benefits for the economy and local community where jobs are scarce and a part of vermont where conventional lending is not an option. we appreciate the inclusion of permanent authorization of this important program. we also very much appreciate inclusion of the reforms to the program, highly important to employers in the seasonal industries. ski resorts in the winter, beach communities and this summer rely on these workers to not -- and not only prove to be excellent employees but bring a cultural experience to states that do not necessarily enjoyed a great deal of diversity. when a trained employee can return for several years in a row, it is a great benefit to all. we thank you for including the sections into the bill. in order to enhance security while adding -- in order to enhance security while also facilitating legitimate travel and trade, we strongly support the addition of but 3500 custom boer patrol officers included in the legislation. in order to ensure that officers are allocated properly, we urge the committee to work with cpb to specify
, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but that doesn't mean that it can't happen. it can happen. if we aren't on our guard all the time
. the economy is getting worse. but the fed is all in. they're at 85 a month. now, maybe some people like jim bulllard are talking about doing more, but that's not on the fed's table right now. what's on their table is potentially tapering out of the 85 a month when the market wants more. the market is stuck. they want more from the fed, because the economy is weakening, or they want the economy to rebound and nothing's happening and we jump around all over the place. >> warren, what do you think? you've been constructive on this market all through the first quarter. you felt like there was more to go here. but do you feel like the psychology is changing with the volatility that we've seen this week? >> i'll tell you, this week has been a little bit troubling, and i have been pretty bullish up until this point. when you tend to see days like this, where the day after day, up and down bid on the dow, 100-plus point move on any given day, that's a sign that this market is truly struggling. >> are you rethinking your bullish position, at least for the short-term? >> a little bit. i think the thi
he told me about the challenges inherent in a unified european economy, part of the conversation this week. >> vastly different social security systems, pension systems, health care systems. if europe wants to move to more common funding of these systems is, which is one of the options at the end of the fiscal union, then they need to harmonize the systems before they move to a fiscal union. if you're talk:00 the common fiscal policy or a fiscal union, it's a decade or more off. >> we had in washington this week, what are your thoughts in terms of how the banks look in the next couple of years? are they going to be forced to sell assets and separate plain vanilla deposit businesses from investment bank, capital markets business? >> the issue is going to be going forward, even if you're well capitalized, can you resolve a bank, even a large bank if it runs into problems. and there i've seen some recent debates among the regulators, and the mood seems to have swung from having very sophisticated systems of separating these to simply say since it will be very difficult, let's just e
our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> somebody clearly framed them. i don't know who exactly but by framed them and then shot the boy dead. i can't reach anyone. i don't know about my children. i'm scared for my boy. they will shoot him dead, and then just say, he had weapons. where can he get weapons for god's sake? they're picking them up at rubbish dumps or what? i'm scared for my son, for his life. they should arrest him. bring him alive. alive. in the judicial system should investigate everything, who is right and who is guilty. >> neil: that's the father of dzhokar tsarnev, still missing out there, still anywhere. trying to find him. the older brother was killed last night in the shootout. we agree on the key legal point, being preferable to catch the brother alive. >> many reasons, you want him alive, want to talk with him, interrogate him, want to know who was he with, who supplied these things? you think about the two young terrorists out there, they couldn't -- it's very unlikely they did everything all of t
? >> my instinct tells me that the answer is no, that in economic terms i think the market, the economy at large will move beyond this relatively quickly. but at the same time, there may be some lingering impact in terms of investor sentiment. the sell-off clearly that occurred on friday and then again on monday, in my opinion, was a reassessment of the pace of global growth. important to point out that most of the weakness yesterday was already in the market before the bombings took place. but clearly, there is an impact on investor sentiment, a reminder that it's a dangerous world. and so you may see a little bit less of a risk appetite going forward. in economic terms, i think we'll move beyond it fairly quickly. >> yeah. john, i guess you would ask, at this point, you wouldn't think that consumers would change behavior based on this. it could potentially aveng -- i don't know, whatever group you want to talk about, jonathan, restaurants or any type of tourists activities. nothing to expect at this point, do you think? >> if you said to me are consumers going to be spending time watc
, boost the u.s. economy as supporters claim it will? lou dobbs is here. lori: let's update you on the markets as we do every 15 minutes, happening fast and furiously. we have the first check in this hour with nicole. what's the word on the floor among traders there, nicole? >> a couple things to note, obviously, we were selling off, back looking at what we looked at on monday, monday, we dropped 265 points, below even those levels. the vix, fear index, up 20% easily showing the nervousness in the market. selling across the board, particularly in economic sensitive areas like energy and technology, and apple, for example, below $400, and we'll is more on that throughout the show. the one thing to note is the volume is not as heavy like we saw on monday. there's less volume and less conviction to the selling; however, the selling is happening across the board. there's economically sensitive areas like financials bringing me to bank of america. reporting their quarterly numbers, look at bank of america. this weighing on the dow jones industrials, but more importantly, bank of amer
obama, i sided with john kerry, i sided with barney frank. on ensuring our entire economy did not collapse. the bush administration for eight years had turned a blind eye to the fact that a casino had been set up on wall street that was now leading to a collapse of our economy. in 2008, i did not support any of the bush administration era financial regulation policies. but when the threat was that the system was going to collapse and hurt every family in america, i did vote to protect our financial system from collapsing and you did not. in addition, on telecommunications, yes, it was my legislation that broke down the telecom monopolies, cable monopolies that led to a broadband revolution beginning in 1996 that has created millions of jobs in the united states of america, including tens of thousands of them here in the massachusetts economy. and i'm very proud of that. and my name is on the legislation, steve. and i'm proud that my name is on much of that legislation because it was my job to go to washington -- >> that's my point. that's my point. you said we weren't -- that'
: thank you for coming on. dagen: government funding is a nonstarter, not a kick starter for the economy. that will not get in the way of the white house trying to spend more money speak that is true, dagen. people in a sense almost do not real. government spending went to this huge peak after tarp. over 25% of our economy. it has now fallen as a share of gdp. we are down close to 22% of gdp. it is still too big. government is actually falling as a share of gdp. first-quarter, the quarter that we just finished will get data for that in about a week. we are expecting about 3% growth. that is pretty good news from the economic front. dagen: is that already factored into this stock market? >> well, at least in the short term i think you are right. i believe the stock market itself is undervalued considerably. in other words, if you go back to early 2009, it is really the rise in profits that has driven this market. if we get any extension, what the investment community called multiples, the stock market could go even higher. the dow is worth it fair value 18,500. we have these pullbacks eve
-causing chemicals to freely circulate in our economy. they will find it unthinkable to assume an attitude of silence and willful ignorance about our ecology. >> sandra steingraber wouldn't stay silent. today she is at the very heart of the environmental human rights movement that she prophesied. she's fighting to identify and eliminate carcinogens in our air, water and food, and to stop fracking, that controversial extraction of natural gas from deep beneath the earth. she is one of the seneca lake 12, a group of activists who last month blocked the gates of a natural gas storage facility in the beautiful finger lakes region of new york state. on a bitterly cold day in march, they were arrested as they demonstrated against the environmental dangers of fracking and the storing of natural gas in nearby abandoned salt mines. for now, new york has declared a moratorium that prohibits fracking in the state while studies are completed. but, there's no guarantee that gas obtained by fracking elsewhere won't be stored in those salt caverns. as you can see, for sandra steingraber, there is no line between he
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